A Focus on the Accent Stone

The accent stone(s) is an important part of some jewelry.  It’s meant to enhance the beauty of the center stone and provide added interest to the jewelry.  Diamonds are the most often used gem for accentuating a piece of jewelry.  They “go” with every other gem, and they add sparkle and richness.  But, what if you want something different for your accent stones?  Are there rules or best practices that apply when choosing accent stones?

An important guideline to follow when creating jewelry is to make sure the accent stones don’t compete with the center stone for attention.  Features such as size, cut, polish, and color should all be considered.  The size of an accent stone should always be smaller than the center stone, but there are many acceptable proportions.  Cut and polish of the accent stones can be similar or quite different from the center stone.  For example, I love the look of this rough drusy quartz with the polished and faceted diamonds.  But the smoothly polished chrysocolla and turquoise pendant is also pleasing to the eye.

Sleeping Drusy Quartz with Diamond Accents

Chrysocolla and Turquoise Cabochon Pendant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The study of color starts with the color wheel.  There are terms for colors that look good together, such as complementary or analogous colors.  Complementary colors are opposite each other on the color wheel, and analogous colors are adjacent.  Monochromatic colors are different tints or tones of the same color.  For example, blue and orange are good colors together.  And blue with green can be a vibrant combination. But dark blue can look great with light blue, too!  

In the end, your eye is the best judge of what colors look good together.  So much depends on the exact tint and hue of each gem.  Some people prefer bold, saturated colors while other people prefer pastels. Don’t be afraid to experiment with the hues of accent stones. Here are some suggestions for accents to put with birthstone gems.

  • January – Red Garnet paired with Yellow-Green Peridot
  • February – Violet Amethyst paired with Yellow Citrine (Note: Ametrine is the natural pairing of these two.)
  • March –  Aquamarine paired with Pink Tourmaline
  • April –  Diamond pairs with anything, but consider Blue Zircon for its high dispersion of light (aka Sparkle!)
  • May  –  vivid Emerald paired with another vivid gem, Blue Sapphire
  • June – Pearl, often used as accent itself, would pair well with the pastel hues of Morganite
  • July – Ruby, another vivid stone, would look great with Emerald as long as you’re okay with Christmas colors.  If not, consider Pink Sapphire, with its less saturated,monochromatic hue, as an accent gem.
  • August – Green Peridot paired with Ethiopian Opal
  • September – Blue Sapphire paired with Orange Spessertine Garnet
  • October – Precious Opal, if white, would pair well with Pink Spinel or Tourmaline.  If the Precious Opal is black, it would pair better with Emerald or Sapphire.
  • November – Yellow Citrine paired with Red Garnet
  • December – Robin’s Egg Blue Turquoise paired with Black Spinel or Diamonds

I recently helped create a Lavender Star Sapphire ring.  The sapphire had a very pale hue, as star sapphires often do. The goal was to enhance its color with effective accents.  We chose faceted trillion amethysts, fairly light in color but more colorful than the sapphire.  When the three were side by side, it really helped the Star Sapphire appear more lavender.  This can be another great use of accent stones.  

Star Sapphire with Light Amethysts

Choosing accent gems for your next jewelry project can be lots of fun.  Diamonds are wonderful, and they’ll never lose their appeal as an accent stone, but there are lots of other possibilities.  We’d be happy to help you figure out your options.  

The Language of Gemstones

Gemstones are part of my life.  I’m around them all day at work!  But many people feel that their interaction with gems and jewels is minimal.  Our language, however, is quite “loaded” with references to gems.  This pervasiveness means that it’s literally impossible to live life without some knowledge of gems.  

Many women, and some MEN!, are named after gemstones.  Have you ever met an Amber, a Ruby, or a Jade?  Other well-known names include Beryl, Pearl, Opal, Jett, and Jasper.  Names like Gemma and Crystal aren’t gemstone names, per se, but they mimic the idea of gems.  And there are plenty of less-common names like Jacinth, Sapphire, and Garnet.

Beryl Markham, Aviatrix, and character in the movie, Out of Africa

Pearl S Buck, author of The Good Earth

 

 

 

 

 

Amber Tamblyn, actress. Starred in Two and a Half Men

Companies like Crayola and Pantene have borrowed names from gemstones to describe their colors.  Do you remember coloring with crayons labeled Aquamarine or Amethyst?  What about Pantene’s Color of the Year last year–Rose Quartz!  Names like Ruby, Emerald, or Turquoise bring colors vividly to mind.  The gemstone names can be colorful adjectives, and the entertainment industry has used them for years.  Remember Dorothy in the Wizard of Oz with her RUBY red slippers? Or how about Dolly Parton singing about Jolene and her eyes of EMERALD green?  

Even gemstones with little or no color get used a lot in our language.  Diamond is the most popular gemstone used in songwriting.  Pearl is the runner-up.  Over 1200 songs were counted as having the word, Diamond.  Rhianna has a recent song, “Diamonds”, which, I’m sure, is quite popular.  My mind goes back to my 8th grade synchronized swimming program, when we swam to “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” by Ethel Merman.  (I guess that dates me, doesn’t it?)

There are sayings and quotations about gemstones.  For example, “Diamond in the Rough” means that something or someone is valuable and good, but not polished or finished.  “Pearls of Wisdom” means rare and worthy words of advice.  Even the Bible contributes to the list with “Pearls before Swine” which talks about not giving out words or things of great value to those who won’t appreciate them.  In general, gemstones are used as synonyms for something or someone rare, valuable, and special.  

I love these funny quotations about gemstones and jewelry that I came across while researching for this blog.

Diamonds are only chunks of coal, that stuck to their jobs, you see.    by Minnie Richard Smith

Jewelry takes people’s minds off your wrinkles.  by Sonja Henie

I think men who have a pierced ear are better prepared for marriage.  They’ve experienced pain and bought jewelry.    by Rita Rudner

But I want to end with a reference to gemstones that we all learned from early in our youth.  This is proof, in my opinion,  that one can’t go through life without some knowledge of gems:

Twinkle, twinkle little star– How I wonder what you are.  Up above the world so high–Like a diamond in the sky. Twinkle, twinkle little star–How I wonder what you are. 

Sculpting Gems

Most of us think of Michelangelo, Picasso, or Rodin when someone mentions sculptors.  But here are three more names of skilled artists who sculpt and polish gem stones.  Tom Munsteiner, Steve Walters, and John Dyer have all won multiple awards for their work.  Here are some examples:

John Dyer

Tom Munsteiner

 

 

 

 

 

Steve Walters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tom Munsteiner is a fourth generation gem stone carver from Germany.  His father, Bernd Munsteiner, is famous for the development of the fantasy cut, and he even has some of his work in the Smithsonian!  Tom knew early on that he wanted to carve gems.  At age 16 he began training with his dad.  One thing I found very interesting is that his dad first taught him how to classically cut gems before attempting any fantasy cuts.  By the time he was 22, he had been trained as a Gemologist and was beginning to win awards for his gemstone creations.  His work is distinguished from his father’s for its softer, less angular designs.  

Steve Walters grew up in California.  He taught himself how to carve gemstones by reading books and practicing.  For a short period, he produced gemstone sculptures for his parents’ company.   In the mid-1980s he started to carve gems for jewelry.  His work is very recognizable as many of the pieces are composites.  He might put gems like onyx, citrine, and hematite together, backed with mother of pearl.  He’s won several A.G.T.A. (American Gem Trade Association) Cutting Edge Awards, and his booth at the Tucson Gem Show is always one of the most popular.  

John Dyer grew up in Brazil, the son of missionaries from the United States.  When his parents saw his interest in gems, they bought him books and helped him obtain his first rough gem stone material.  John tells the story of taking his rough to a cutter who overcharged him and did a terrible job.  That’s when he decided to cut his own gems.  With lots of practice and a few “disasters”, he’s become one of the most recognized gem stone cutters and has won over 50 cutting awards.  

At Dearborn Jewelers of Plymouth, we’ve been fortunate to set gem stones cut by all three of these artists.  It’s so gratifying to see these gems being worn and appreciated.  Here are some of our designs.  If you’re inspired to have your own creation by one of these well-known artists, come and talk to us.  We’d love to help.

Blue Topaz by John Dyer

Composite with Watermelon Tourmaline by Steve Walters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peridot by Tom Munsteiner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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History of Birthstones

garnet

Garnet: January birthstone

Most of my life I’ve wished I was born a few days earlier, mainly because my birthstone would be an emerald instead of pearl or alexandrite.  When it came time to buy my high school class ring, I chose the emerald green stone rather than the pale purple one.  When my husband and I designed our 30-year anniversary ring, we designed it with an emerald for the center stone, even though pearl is the traditional gift for the 30-year anniversary.  As you can see, I’ve always just gone with what I wanted rather than what I was ‘supposed’ to want.  But my decisions got me to thinking about the origin of birthstones.  Who deemed that each month be represented by a different gemstone?  When was this decision made?  And why?

My research on these questions has revealed an interesting and somewhat nonsensical journey.  Most sources say that the idea of birthstones started with the Bible and Aaron’s breastplate.  Aaron had 12 stones in his breastplate, representing the 12 tribes of Israel.  No one knows for sure what the 12 stones were, but chances are high that they were pretty rocks, like jasper or lapis.  These are rocks that were native to the area.

A first century historian named Josephus supposedly made the numeric connection between the 12 stones and the 12 months of the year.  For centuries the idea was to have 12 stones, carrying a different one each month.  They weren’t really birthstones because they weren’t associated with the owner’s birth.  They were associated with months of the year.  The individual stones were supposed to bring good luck and good health during each one’s specific month.

But somewhere along the way, the idea changed.  Experts say that between the 15th and 18th centuries, people began to see themselves as having one stone, corresponding to the month of their birth, that would bring them good fortune.  These stones, with a few exceptions, are very different from the birthstones of today.  Have you ever heard of bloodstone?  It’s an opaque green stone with red spots.  It was the birthstone for March.  How about sardonyx?  That’s a banded, rusty brown-colored, translucent chalcedony that was the birthstone for August.

Bloodstone: March birthstone

Bloodstone: March birthstone

Sardonyx: August birthstone

Sardonyx: August birthstone

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 1912, Jewelers of America, an association with a definite interest in marketing gemstones, sought to standardize the list.  The official list of birthstones had garnet, amethyst, aquamarine, diamond, emerald, pearl, ruby, peridot, sapphire, opal, topaz (the orange-yellow-brown kind), and turquoise.  Some of the months had two birthstones, partly in deference to the traditional stones.  So March had aquamarine AND bloodstone.  August had peridot AND sardonyx.  But, let’s face it, if you were born in March, which gem would you rather have?  A transparent medium blue one or an opaque dark green one with red blemishes?  It didn’t take long to drop these traditional choices.

The 1912 list has had few changes in the last 100+ years.  In 1952, alexandrite was added as a birthstone for June and citrine was added as a birthstone for November.  December’s traditional birthstone of lapis lazuli was replaced with blue zircon.  In 2002, tanzanite, the blue-purple gemstone that had been discovered in 1967, was added to the list for December.  And, most recently, in 2016, spinel was added as a birthstone for August.

Why the additions?  Many people would say it’s a marketing move.  Birthstones aren’t really seen as bringing good luck or good health anymore.   They don’t have the significance they used to have.  They’re just fun.  So why not have more choices?  I’m really happy for all you August babies who no longer feel confined to the yellowish-green of peridot.  Spinel offers great variety! (See my blog on spinel–July 28, 2016).

So, what do we make of this idea of birthstones?  To me it sounds like a complicated game of Telephone.  Do you remember that game when someone whispers a phrase to someone else, and it goes around the circle?  The final uttering of the phrase bears no resemblance to the original.  That’s how I feel birthstones came to be.  From Aaron’s breastplate to the writings of Josephus to the Jewelers’ list, it’s a crazy, convoluted path. But this is where we are and what we have.  My suggestion?  Adopt your favorite gemstone, the one that has meaning to you,  and make it YOUR birthstone.

amethyst

Amethyst: February birthstone