“L O V E” your jewelry

IMG_8149

       Ruby= R; Emerald = E; Garnet = G; Amethyst = A; Ruby = R; Diamond = D

                                             What does it all spell?  REGARD!

When it comes to creating jewelry that holds deep meaning and sentiment, the makers of the Victorian age were experts.  They had to be, because the rules of behavior dictated discretion.  Jewelry was a way to communicate love.  Pendants containing locks of loved-ones’ hair were popular.  Queen Victoria wore mourning jewelry for her late husband, Prince Albert, for over 30 years.

While I’m not advocating a revival of either of these sentimental declarations, I really like the idea of acrostic jewelry that was conceived in the early 1800s.  Acrostic jewelry works a little bit like the game, Scrabble.  The first letter of each gemstone can be used to form a word or name, and those gemstones can be placed in jewelry either in or out of order.  For example, you could take the word “A D O R E” and make a beautiful pendant with an Amethyst, Diamond, Opal, Ruby, and Emerald.  The word “B E L O V E D” looks wonderful  as a ring!

beloved

Sometimes the gemstones look better out of order because of their color.  Personally, I like the letters out of order.  It’s a little romantic secret between the giver and the receiver!

Giving an acrostic piece of jewelry takes some time and planning, which can be part of the fun and is definitely part of the meaning.  You wouldn’t go to the trouble for someone you just sort of like.  But the piece wouldn’t have to be extremely expensive.  Some letters have many alternatives, so if “Ruby” doesn’t fit the budget, perhaps “Rose quartz” or “Rhodolite garnet” would.  If you like opaque as well as transparent gems, you could even go with “Rhodocrosite.”

Once you start playing around with words, gemstones, and jewelry designs, it’s difficult to know when to stop.  One of my favorites was “C H E R I S H” with Chalcedony, Heliodor, Emerald, Ruby, Indicolite, Spinel, and Hessonite garnet. It would make a pretty and affordable ring.

Some words are more difficult.  If you really want to write “L O V E”, there is a way to get around the fact that no pretty gemstones start with “V.”  Although it has a different meaning today, the word Vermeil, signified a hessonite garnet to the Victorians.

Spend the time when buying fine jewelry.  These pieces should have a good story to journey with them.  Take a trip out to Dearborn Jewelers and let our designers help you create a special piece for your loved one.  Maybe the Victorians had it right with their sentimental, old-fashioned gooeyness. Old-fashioned doesn’t have to be out-of-fashion.

 

Remodel Your Jewelry

So many women these days have jewelry they never wear.  It’s too big, it’s too small, it’s not my style, it has too many bad memories. Hearing their stories always makes me sad.  I understand the reasons but I don’t understand the waste.

I’ve never met a person who didn’t value putting things to their best use.  We all tell our story of a ratty old sweater we finally had to throw out because it just had too many holes in it.  We scrape the inside of the peanut butter jar.  We like candles that burn to the end of the wick.  My mother even cuts old bath towels into dust rags and, when they get too unsightly to dust with, they become my father’s rags for the garage.

Time to repurpose it!

Time to repurpose it!

So when jewelry isn’t getting used, it’s time to repurpose it!  One way to do that is to bring it in to Dearborn Jewelers for a remodel.  Not long ago, a customer came in with the wedding ring from her first marriage, a pair of diamond studs from her high school graduation, and two opal rings she no longer wore.  We talked about what she would want, and then sketched out a pendant for herself and one for each of her two young daughters to receive when they get a bit older.

Nick, the master bench jeweler, was able to use, not only the stones, but also the metal from the old jewelry to create some unique, one of a kind pendants for our customer and her daughters.  She wears hers often and loves it.  And, certainly, it is beautiful.  But one of the reasons she loves it is because it comes with a story of taking something useless and transforming it to something treasured. How might you create a new treasure?

Daughter's pendant

Daughter’s pendant

Mom's new pendant

Mom’s new pendant

Daughter's pendant

Daughter’s pendant