I never realized there were so many good luck charms until I started working at a jewelry store.  Sure, I knew of the 4-leaf clover and the rabbit’s foot, but I’d never heard of the “ankh” and the “cornicello.”  One of my more embarrassing moments came recently when a woman came in with her husband’s necklace.  It needed repair so I wrote up a repair slip, describing the piece as a “hot pepper pendant on a gold chain.”  Everyone laughed at me when I took it back to the shop.  “That’s not a hot pepper,” chuckled the bench jeweler.  “That’s a gorno.”

The "corno" pendant

The “corno” pendant

“Huh? What’s a gorno?”  Well, truth is, he wasn’t completely sure.  And the fact is, it’s not a gorno.  It’s a corno or a cornicello.  Turns out this is the Italian word for “horn” or “little horn.”  It apparently protects the wearer from the evil eye.  The evil eye is a look, given to inflict harm or bad luck.  There is widespread belief in the power of the evil eye, but, supposedly, it started in ancient Greece.

Now, the “evil eye” I’d seen before, a few months back when working with a different customer.  It’s kind of confusing, because some people wear an amulet of an eye, as protection from evil.  They call the amulet the evil eye.  So I guess an “evil eye” can be either bad luck OR good luck.

I think every culture has their own version of a good luck charm.  The “ankh”(pronounced awnk) is actually the Egyptian symbol for life.  As the key of life, it represents zest and energy, and some people wear it as a protection from demons.  It resembles a Christian cross, but has a loop at the top.

The "ankh" pendant

The “ankh” pendant

I guess we all can use a little good luck from time to time.   Can it hurt to wear a good luck charm?  It’s just nice to know there are so many options.