Tag: acrostic jewelry

“L O V E” your jewelry

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       Ruby= R; Emerald = E; Garnet = G; Amethyst = A; Ruby = R; Diamond = D

                                             What does it all spell?  REGARD!

When it comes to creating jewelry that holds deep meaning and sentiment, the makers of the Victorian age were experts.  They had to be, because the rules of behavior dictated discretion.  Jewelry was a way to communicate love.  Pendants containing locks of loved-ones’ hair were popular.  Queen Victoria wore mourning jewelry for her late husband, Prince Albert, for over 30 years.

While I’m not advocating a revival of either of these sentimental declarations, I really like the idea of acrostic jewelry that was conceived in the early 1800s.  Acrostic jewelry works a little bit like the game, Scrabble.  The first letter of each gemstone can be used to form a word or name, and those gemstones can be placed in jewelry either in or out of order.  For example, you could take the word “A D O R E” and make a beautiful pendant with an Amethyst, Diamond, Opal, Ruby, and Emerald.  The word “B E L O V E D” looks wonderful  as a ring!

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Sometimes the gemstones look better out of order because of their color.  Personally, I like the letters out of order.  It’s a little romantic secret between the giver and the receiver!

Giving an acrostic piece of jewelry takes some time and planning, which can be part of the fun and is definitely part of the meaning.  You wouldn’t go to the trouble for someone you just sort of like.  But the piece wouldn’t have to be extremely expensive.  Some letters have many alternatives, so if “Ruby” doesn’t fit the budget, perhaps “Rose quartz” or “Rhodolite garnet” would.  If you like opaque as well as transparent gems, you could even go with “Rhodocrosite.”

Once you start playing around with words, gemstones, and jewelry designs, it’s difficult to know when to stop.  One of my favorites was “C H E R I S H” with Chalcedony, Heliodor, Emerald, Ruby, Indicolite, Spinel, and Hessonite garnet. It would make a pretty and affordable ring.

Some words are more difficult.  If you really want to write “L O V E”, there is a way to get around the fact that no pretty gemstones start with “V.”  Although it has a different meaning today, the word Vermeil, signified a hessonite garnet to the Victorians.

Spend the time when buying fine jewelry.  These pieces should have a good story to journey with them.  Take a trip out to Dearborn Jewelers and let our designers help you create a special piece for your loved one.  Maybe the Victorians had it right with their sentimental, old-fashioned gooeyness. Old-fashioned doesn’t have to be out-of-fashion.