Quartz-So Common and yet so Special

Flawless Quartz Crystal Sphere at the Smithsonian Natural History Museum (106.75 lbs)

Flawless Quartz Crystal Sphere at the Smithsonian Natural History Museum (106.75 lbs)

This crystal sphere is the largest cut piece of  flawless quartz in the world, weighing in at 242,323 carats!  It symbolizes our fascination with something so beautiful and yet so common.  Quartz is found around the world, in large quantities, and is considered one of the most common minerals on Earth.  It’s found in sand, dirt, and dust.  Yet, when fashioned by gem cutters and put in a stunning piece of jewelry, it can be breathtaking.

Quartz is a complicated gemstone.  One of the reasons it’s tricky is because the term “quartz” is used for varieties of gems, as well as for a species of gem and as a group of gems.  So, for example, Rose Quartz is a variety of the species Quartz.  So is Citrine, Amethyst, and Tiger’s Eye!  All these varieties, and others that are couched under the species of Chalcedony, such as Agate and Jasper, are considered to be members of the group, Quartz.  Very confusing!!

Perhaps it’s best to start with the fact that mineralogists and geologists see any mineral with the chemical makeup of silicon dioxide, SiO2, as Quartz.  Regardless of whether the crystals making up that stone are large, small, or microscopic, it’s all Quartz.  Gemologists, on the other hand, separate the gems into those whose crystals are larger and those too small to see without a high-powered microscope.  Those with larger crystals are called Quartz and those with microcrystalline structures are labeled Chalcedony.

Under these two species are many varieties that are used in jewelry.  Probably the most commonly known variety of the quartz species is Amethyst.  That regal purple has been admired for centuries.  The purple color comes from natural irradiation acting upon a trace element of iron.  The saturated, medium to deep reddish purple is the most prized color, but amethyst ranges from a light, pinkish purple to that deep purple hue.  Amethyst is not rare, but the prized color is more rare because usually only the tips of the amethyst crystals have that depth of color.

Agate and Amethyst, showing the deep purple tips of the quartz crystals, as well as the microcrystalline Agate, which is part of the Chalcedony species.

Agate and Amethyst, showing the deep purple tips of the quartz crystals, as well as the microcrystalline Agate, which is part of the Chalcedony species.

Other varieties of the Quartz species include Citrine, the orange-yellow gemstone that’s November’s birthstone, and Rock Crystal, which is colorless because it has no trace elements.  There’s also Rose Quartz, Smoky Quartz, Prasiolite (aka Green Amethyst), and Ametrine (a bi-colored gem combining the purple of Amethyst and the yellow of Citrine).

Members the Chalcedony species have been used in jewelry even longer than Amethyst!  Agates, which exhibit wavy bands of color, were used in amulets and talismans over 3000 years ago.  They were also used to make cameos.  Carvers would reveal a differently colored band by carving down around the subject of the piece.  Today you’ll see agate slice pendants that are sometimes dyed to accentuate the banding.

Probably the most valuable member of the Chalcedony species is Chrysoprase.  This translucent gemstone is beloved for its natural apple-green color.  It owes its color to the presence of  nickel.  A big discovery of Chrysoprase was made in 1965 in Australia.  Because its color can resemble fine jadeite, it’s sometimes called “Australian Jade.”

Chrysoprase cabochon

Chrysoprase cabochon

Other varieties of the Chalcedony species include Black Onyx (dyed black chalcedony), Carnelian, Jasper, and Fire Agate.  Most chalcedony is translucent to opaque, so it’s rarely faceted.  Most often it’s fashioned into beads, slices or cabochons.  But, just like all Quartz, it registers a 7 on the Mohs Hardness Scale, making it a good choice for rings and bracelets as well as earrings and pendants.

There’s so much that can be said about this beautiful mineral that surrounds us everyday.  But I want to end with the sentiment– “How wonderful when something so common can also be so special!”

Custom-made Ametrine Ring in our showcase!

Custom-made Ametrine Ring in our showcase!

 

The Latest Trend: the Two-Stone Ring

Maybe you’ve seen the ads on TV.  A laughing couple in a car, sharing a private moment as they drive a country road.  They are in love.  But they’re also best friends.  And that’s the story of the two-stone engagement ring.  It represents the dual nature of their relationship.

two-stone ring

The two-stone ring is the latest in a fairly long line of styles promoted by De Beers, the diamond company that, for most of the last century, was the biggest supplier of uncut diamonds.  Their ability to create demand for diamonds started with the famous phrase from the 1940s–A Diamond is Forever.  And it worked so well that Ad Age, a magazine that analyzes and reports on the marketing world, named it the number one slogan of the 20th century.

A decade ago, it was all about the three-stone engagement ring, or, as it was sometimes called, the trinity ring.  The three stones signify your relationship’s past, present, and future.  Or the trio can be seen as signifying friendship, love, and fidelity.   The most common version of this ring had smaller stones on the left and right with a larger stone in the middle.

three stone ring1

Also around ten years ago, the journey necklace was advertised widely as a sentimental way to think about your journey together with the person you love.  Their were several styles, for example the ladder, circle, heart, or S, but most had five or seven diamonds.

journey necklace1journey necklace2

 

 

 

 

 

Other pieces De Beers promoted were the diamond tennis bracelet (1988), the bezel-set diamond solitaire necklace (1998), and the right-hand ring (2003).  I laughed when I saw the date on the bezel-set necklace.  My husband bought me my necklace in 1999.  It’s funny because I’ve never thought of advertising as being influential on my husband or myself.  We don’t watch much TV and we hardly ever pay attention to commercials, except for the Superbowl ads.  But good advertising does work, and the company that advertises for De Beers is very, very good at it.

And their goal is obvious.  They want you to buy more diamonds and especially smaller diamonds.  Why smaller?  Because there are many, many more small diamonds than large.  That’s also the reason why buying a carat’s worth of small diamonds is much less expensive than buying a single, one carat stone.  As a quick test, I looked at one diamond vendor’s pricing on one carat, one-half carat, and one-third carat stones.  The pricing follows a more exponential pattern.  Keeping the other variables of cut, color, and clarity stable, a 1/3-carat stone was about $1000, a 1/2- carat was $3000, and a 1-carat was around $9000.  A three-stone or two-stone ring, by carat weight, can be quite cost effective.

The point of my blog is this:  Buy a style of ring you love rather than the style that is being promoted at the moment.  Don’t get swayed by the sentimentality of the story.  Your ring should represent what you want it to represent–not some story made up by someone in advertising.

 

 

Colorful Stories of Three Colored Gemstones

The romance and history of colored gemstones has always fascinated me.  I guess I’m just a sucker for a good story.  Here are three I thought you might like.

TANZANITE:  It’s said that we are all members of the “Tanzanite generation.”  Discovered in 1967 by a Masai tribesman in Northern Tanzania, Tanzanite is mined in only one, 4 square kilometer, location.  And the mines are getting deeper and harder to mine profitably.   We will be the ones who can buy a new Tanzanite.  Future generations will only see the stone in heirloom pieces.  It’s estimated that Tanzanite One, the largest Tanzanite mining company, has less than 30 years of production left.

The gemstone was named by Henry Platt, great-grandson of the famous Louis C. Tiffany.  Tiffany and Co. realized the importance of the gemstone and quickly made themselves the main distributor.  Their marketing efforts made tanzanite one of the most popular gemstones by the 1990s.  The beautiful gem hit the big screen with a “splash” as the Heart of the Ocean in the movie, Titanic.

KateWinslet

MORGANITE: This pink to orange/pink variety of beryl was originally discovered in Pala, California in the early 1900s.  It was named for J.P. Morgan, a great financier and collector of minerals.  Tiffany’s gem buyer and gemologist, George Kunz, was the man who named the gem, buying up all he could find for his wealthy client.  Incidentally, another pink gemstone, discovered at about the same time, was named Kunzite in honor of George Kunz.  So, he got his own gemstone, too!

Morganite is the same species of mineral as Emerald and Aquamarine.  Like Aquamarine, it is usually an eye-clean stone that can be cut in larger sizes.  It’s a good thing, too, because a larger stone usually shows a more saturated color.  Pale Morganite often needs that advantage.   It’s generally heat-treated to improve its pink color and minimize its yellowish tint.  The treatment is stable, so no fading occurs. morganite2

ALEXANDRITE: First discovered in Russia’s Ural Mountains in the early 1830s,  Alexandrite is the quintessential color-change gemstone.  It was found by miners who thought they’d found emeralds, until nighttime came and they were sitting around the campfire.  Alexandrite’s trace elements of iron, titanium, and chromium make it greenish in sunlight and reddish in incandescent or fire light.  Boy, were those miners surprised when, the next morning, their red gemstones had turned back to green!

Legend says that the gem was found on the 16th birthday of young Alexander II, future Czar of Russia.  The stone became the National Gem of Czarist Russia.  It was the perfect fit with the red and green color scheme of imperial Russia’s military.  Every Russian had to have an Alexandrite.  Unfortunately, for all of us, the Russian supply was depleted.  Fortunately, other deposits have been found in Sri Lanka, East Africa, and Brazil.

Natural Alexandrites are very expensive, especially in larger sizes.  Even the synthetic version is expensive, because it’s difficult to manufacture.  But, if you’re lucky enough to own an Alexandrite, you have an “Emerald by day, and a Ruby by night.”

alexandrite

The Story of Campbellite

campbellite

I’ve lived most of my life in Michigan and my maiden name is Campbell.  Most people don’t know that because I’ve been married so long!  But I always thought Campbell was a good name, so I was both happy and surprised to learn that there is a gemstone named after. . .no, not me, nor my kinfolk, but after the Campbell shaft of the well known Bisbee Mine in Southern Arizona.

So, what’s the story of Campbellite?  As explained by one of the stone cutters at Arizona Lapidary, Campbellite is an uncertain  mixture of minerals like cuprite, azurite, malachite, calcite,chrysocolla, pyrite, quartz, and copper.  Its color and look varies because there’s no set amount of these minerals.  It was first discovered by miners looking for copper.  The bosses weren’t interested in this unusual rock, and told the miners to discard it.  But the miners had a different plan.  They saw its beauty.  So, yes, they dumped the Campbellite in the trashcan.  But they separated it carefully from the real trash.  And when no one was looking, they loaded the discarded gem into the back ends of pickups.  Campbellite has been showing up in the market, piece by piece.  There’s not a lot of it–I’m sure plenty WAS dumped.  The mine closed in 1975, and there is no other known source of Campbellite.  But I bought one piece of it, cut into a smooth cabochon, and plan to make a bolo tie for my dad.

I learned a little bit about the mine shaft itself.  It was first developed in 1927, originally as a way to get oxygen to other parts of the Bisbee Mine.  But soon it was one of the best producers of copper ore, with yields of 8-10% copper.

Finally, who is the Campbell shaft named after?  A little research revealed an amazing coincidence.  The shaft was named after Gordon R. Campbell, who actually lived and went to school in Michigan!  He graduated from U of M in 1893 and was a mining executive and lawyer up in the Keweenaw Peninsula.  The Keweenaw Peninsula, jutting from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, is one of the best known sources of copper world-wide.   Towns like Calumet, Houghton, and Copper Harbor were booming back in the mid-1800s because of copper.  Anyway, Gordon Campbell helped form the Calumet and Arizona Mining Company in 1901, serving as the company’s President from 1921-1931.   It was this company that operated the Bisbee Mine.  So Campbellite WAS named for a Campbell living in Michigan.  Who knows?  Maybe he’s a long, lost cousin?

The Campbell shaft, courtesy of the Arizona Historical Society

The Campbell shaft, courtesy of the Arizona Historical Society

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Group to Know–the American Gem Society

American Gem Society

If you’ve bought a diamond recently, it probably came with a diamond report.  And that report might very well have come from the American Gem Society Laboratories (A.G.S.L.).  The story of the American Gem Society is an interesting one that started back in 1934.   Back then and still today, the A.G.S. is an organization dedicated to the maintenance of high ethical standards in the jewelry industry.  Its primary purposes are 1) to encourage professional education within the jewelry industry and 2) build consumer confidence and trust in the knowledge, integrity, and competence of professionals in the jewelry industry.

Robert Shipley is the man responsible for starting A.G.S.  He came from a retail jewelry background here in the U.S., but, after spending some time in Paris learning more about gemology, he felt that the industry lacked the education it needed.  He started a correspondence school in 1931 called the Gemological Institute of America (G.I.A.) Three years later he established the American Gem Society, a sort of alumni association of G.I.A.  The society started out small, and it was housed in the same building as G.I.A.  Mr. Shipley was the President of G.I.A. and the Executive Director of A.G.S.

Al Woodhill took over as Executive Director of A.G.S. in 1946, and in 1948 the organization moved into its own headquarters.  In 1955, A.G.S. established a Diamond Standards Committee which published the first A.G.S. Diamond Grading Standards Manual in 1966.   Diamonds are evaluated using the 4Cs–cut, color, clarity, and carat weight.  Carat weight is measured, but cut, color, and clarity are graded using a 0 – 10 point scale.   Triple zero would be the grade given to the Ideally cut, Colorless, and Flawless diamond.

The American Gem Society , LLC opened in 1996 and became a leader in the grading of diamonds.  Its Diamond Quality Document presents a complete analysis and documentation of the 4Cs.  It provides both the professional and the customer with the details needed to fully understand what is being purchased.

Today’s customers can feel confident about their purchases if they are buying from an A.G.S. member store.  Standards and regulations protect the consumer in a way that customers one hundred years ago could never have expected.  Consumer confidence benefits everyone–customers, retailers, and suppliers.  We owe our appreciation to Robert Shipley and the American Gem Society.

rbt shipley

October’s Complicated Birthstones

Black Opal and Rubellite Tourmaline

Black Opal and Rubellite Tourmaline

I’m married to a man born in October, and I can testify that he’s complicated. But I never thought October’s two birthstones had unusual complexity to them until I started to really study them. Tourmaline has a complex physical nature while Opal has a complex history and symbolic nature. Let’s see if light can be shed on these two amazing gems.

TOURMALINE:  

Tourmaline wasn’t recognized as a separate group of minerals until the 1800s. It comes in an unbelievable array of colors, so chrome tourmaline was often mistaken for emerald. Rubellite tourmaline was thought to be ruby. Back in the days before modern mineralogy, gem stones were often identified by their color. Chemically, tourmaline is complicated because many of its elements have the ability to replace one another in a process called isomorphous replacement. That’s why tourmaline from the Paraiba mine in Brazil can be neon blue. Copper is part of its chemical makeup. That’s why chrome tourmaline from Tanzania can be a deep, almost emerald green. Chromium is part of its formula. Pink tourmaline from Zambia has magnesium and black tourmaline (also called schorl) has iron. These gems all have the same basic chemical formula, but it’s a formula that allows for lots of substitutions.

The crystal habit of tourmaline is a unique 3-sided column, with cross sections that resemble rounded triangles. It’s not uncommon to see different colors evident in the same crystal, leading to bi- and tri-colored tourmaline. There’s even watermelon tourmaline which has cross sections that show pink centers and green boundaries. The value of tourmaline is complicated, too. A high quality Paraiba tourmaline sells for tens of thousands of dollars per carat. A large piece of black tourmaline sells on Amazon for under $10.

Paraiba tourmalines photographed from the GIA Collection for the CIBJO project from the Dr. Eduard J. Gubelin Collection.

Paraiba tourmalines photographed from the GIA Collection for the CIBJO project from the Dr. Eduard J. Gubelin Collection.

OPAL:

What’s quite complex about opal is its reputation. It falls in and out of favor, depending on who writes about it, who wears it, and what superstitious stories are made up about it. From ancient mythology, the opal was said to be a symbol of purity, hope, and innocence. It was supposed to be protection against evil. But, during the Black Plague of the 14th century, opal wearers often died. The rumor circulated that it was the opal that caused death. Opals were evil! In the 1500s opinion changed. Shakespeare wrote about opal as the “queen of gems.” It became popular once again. But, in the early 1800s, Sir Walter Scott wrote a book whose character, Lady Hermione, dies soon after a drop of holy water destroys her opal’s colors. It’s uncertain what caused Hermione’s death, but the opal market was clearly dead for 50 years because of Sir Walter Scott’s book.

In 1877, an amazing Australian black opal was discovered, and Queen Victoria decided that she liked opals. Opals were good! She gave one to each of her five daughters, and her love of it made the gem popular again. Today, opals still swim in complexity. Sometimes I’ll hear customers talk about the superstition of opal only being good luck to those born in October. Or they’ll talk about Sir Walter Scott’s book. But my opal has never brought me anything but joy–and I was born in June!

If you’re born in October, be proud of the fact that your birthstones are complicated. It’s much more interesting than perfect clarity! Embrace the mystery.

Opal cabochon

Opal cabochon

Why Start with D? A History of Diamond Grading

Round Brilliant diamonds of different sizes.

Most couples looking for a diamond engagement ring are already familiar with the color scale for diamonds.  They know that “D” is the “best” if you want a colorless diamond.  It’s just accepted.  But why start with D?  There are historical reasons why color grading doesn’t start at the beginning of the alphabet.  The story is interesting, but basically boils down to the struggle between metaphoric or geographic vs. scientific description.

In the late 1800s, when diamonds and diamond mines were being discovered and dug in Cape Province, South Africa, there was little consistency in the description of diamonds.  Diamond brokers came up with various ways to grade diamonds, using I, II, and III or A, B, and C to indicate quality.  Later, AA and AAA were used to indicate even higher quality than A.  There was a wide range of diamonds that fell into each quality designation, and the grade often depended on who was doing the grading.  There was no set grading system that everyone agreed to follow.   The goal was to sell diamonds, so grade inflation was common.

Some grading terms were even more vague than A, B, and C.  Old world terms for colorless diamonds included “River”, “Finest White”, and “Jager.”  Where do these terms come from?  River was meant to indicate the clear, as water, nature of a colorless diamond.  Jager was a nickname for the Jagersfontein Mine in South Africa, a mine known for the exceptional quality and clarity of its diamonds.  This mine was also known for producing two of the biggest diamonds ever found, the 972 carat Excelsior and the 637 carat Jubilee.

In the 1930s, when the Gemological Institute of America(GIA) was first established, it focused on the science of gemology and the importance of education.  Eager to bring more consistency to diamond grading, the GIA developed its international diamond grading scale in 1953.   It wanted to clearly separate its scale from existing scales.  The GIA started with D so as not to be confused with the A, B, and C grades that already existed in other, less consistent scales.  That’s why the scale starts with D and goes through Z for the normal color range of diamonds.  The GIA scale is much more scientific, with more grades and a set of master stones to represent each color grade.  Skilled graders compare stones to this master set under specific lighting conditions.

The American Gemological Society(AGS) has a numeric as well as letter grading system, with D equal to 0.0, E equal to 0.5, F equal to 1.0 and so on.  Both the GIA and AGS use descriptive words to go along with their grades so, for instance, grades of D, E, and F are described as colorless while grades of S through Z are described as light yellow.  If a diamond is more yellow than the Z master stone, it’s actually a fancy colored diamond and is graded using a different system.

So it was those diamond sellers back in the 1800s that shaped the system we have today.  Even with the unusual starting point, consumers should be grateful for the consistent grading that the GIA and AGS provide.

 

Carats vs. Karats

What’s the difference between carats, karats, carrots, and carets?  They all sound the same, but they have very unique meanings.  And two of them, carats and karats, are commonly used words in the jewelry industry.

CARAT:

Used to describe the mass of a diamond and other gemstones, a carat is a measure of weight.  One carat is equal to 0.2 grams or approximately 0.007 ounces.  The name, carat, comes from ancient times when carob beans were used on a balancing scale to measure the weight of light objects like gemstones.  A carob bean doesn’t weigh much but, more importantly, carob beans are very consistent in their weight and size.  Each one weighs about 0.007 ounces (about the same weight as a paperclip).  Another way to think about it is that it takes about 142 beans to make one ounce.

balancing scale

1 carob bean = 1 carat diamond

Historically, weighing light objects wasn’t done consistently. The carob bean was used throughout the Middle East and Europe.  Grains of wheat or rice were used elsewhere.  And the carat was used to weigh other things besides gemstones.   There wasn’t a standard carat weight that was used in all countries.  But in 1907, the 4th General Conference on Weights and Measures adopted the “metric carat”, equal to 0.2 grams or 200 mg, as the official and world-wide measurement for diamonds and gemstones.

KARAT:

The term, karat, is usually used to indicate the fineness of a gold alloy.  It is a measure of purity.  Twenty-four karat gold signifies 100% pure gold.  So, using your knowledge of fractions, you can determine that 18 karat gold has 75% gold and 25% other metals. (You can also see my previous blog on metal alloys.).  Fourteen karat gold has 58% gold and 42% other metals.

Interestingly enough, the measure, karat, came from the German carat.  The Germans had a gold coin, called a “mark”, which weighed exactly 24 carats (4.8 grams).  The purity of the gold in the coin was expressed as the number of carats of gold present in the 24-carat coin.  Somehow, the letter was changed from “c” to “k” and the karat was born.

So, what about “caret” and “carrot?”  Well, a caret is a wedge-shaped symbol indicating the place where something is to be inserted.  And a carrot?  Well, I’ll let Bugs Bunny explain that one.

_CARET

Bugs%20Bunny%20Carrot

The History and Origins and Stories of Turquoise

Turquoise_Cerillos_Smithsonian

Almost everyone has heard of Turquoise.  It is one of the oldest, most popular gem stones of all time.  Turquoise has a rich and colorful history, and it originates in a few places around the globe.  Studying turquoise is like taking a journey around the world and back in time.  Sounds fun, right?

HISTORY AND ORIGIN

Imagine yourself in the time of King Tut, in Egypt, around 1330BC.  Thousands of laborers worked the mines in the Sinai Peninsula, finding turquoise for the pharaohs.  When King Tut’s treasures were discovered, they included pieces of beautiful blue turquoise.  Although the mines in the Sinai had long been forgotten and depleted, when they were re-discovered in the mid-1800s, people did try to work them.

In the 12th and 13th centuries AD, on the other side of the world, in the land of the Native Americans, turquoise was mined for the Aztec Kings.  It was used for pendants, beads, and for trade.  Proof exists that the prehistoric peoples of the Anasazi and Hohokam tribes mined turquoise in areas we call the Southwest, and traded it to people who carried it hundreds of miles from its origin.

The robin’s egg blue of “Persian turquoise” was treasured by the peoples of Persia (now Iran), Afghanistan, Siberia, and Turkistan (now Turkey).   Turquoise was found in ancient graves dating from the first to third century AD.  And it was from this area that turquoise first made its way to Europe in the late 1600s.  Because it traveled through the land named by the French as Turquie, many believe that the stone got its name by Frenchmen who thought Turquie was its origin.

China’s love of turquoise dates back to the thirteenth century AD.  There it was used mostly for carving and decorative items.   In Tibet, the stone was used for currency and as an amulet.  Although there were a few mines in China, most of their source came from Persia, Tibet, and Turkey.

AMERICAN ORIGIN

Now that we’ve traveled around the world, let’s focus on our own backyard–the Southwestern states of Nevada, Arizona, and New Mexico.  There are many mines in each of these states and turquoise lovers know the origins of their stones.

NEVADA:

The Ajax Mine, a relatively new mine, yields stones ranging from light blue with dark blue veins to dark green with light blue areas. The Blue Diamond Mine, inaccessible in the winter months, produces light to deep blue turquoise exhibiting swirling or mottled patterns of light and dark blues.  Carico Lake Mine resides on a dried up lake bed, and its turquoise is a clean spring green color with black spider web matrix.

ARIZONA:

Bisbee, Arizona is the site of the Bisbee Mine, closed since the early 1970s, but known for the intense blue color of its turquoise and the fine webbing of its dark matrix.  The Kingman Mine is one of largest domestic turquoise mines.  Its turquoise ranges from light to dark blue with some tints of green.  Its matrix can range from white, light brown to black and it’s frequently flecked with pyrite or quartz.  The Sleeping Beauty Mine produces a soft blue, like a robin’s egg blue, turquoise, with little or no matrix.

NEW MEXICO:

The Cerrillos Mine, 10 miles south of Santa Fe, is the oldest known source of turquoise in America.  The huge deposit was originally exposed at the surface but has now been mined more than 200 feet deep. The turquoise that comes from Cerrillos varies in color from tan and khaki green to blue-green, blue, and even white.

STORIES

My own story of turquoise starts in Tucson, Arizona at the 2015 Gem Show.  Wanting to buy a piece of turquoise, I came upon Helen Shull, owner of Out of Our Mines, in Nevada.  She told me that the piece of turquoise I selected came from a new mine called the Candelaria Pickhandle Mine.  The interesting name comes from the fact that an old pickhandle, left by a miner decades ago, sent the signal that turquoise was present.  Helen and her husband, out walking their land in Nevada, found this old, long forgotten pickhandle and began to mine the area.  My piece is beautiful, blue with golden matrix.

turq1

My favorite story of turquoise came from the Native Americans who saw the blue stone as giving of life and good fortune.  One of their legends says that people danced and rejoiced when the rains came, and their tears of joy mixed with the rain and seeped into Mother Earth.  That mixture became the “fallen sky stone”–Turquoise.

Much of my information for this blog came from http://www.traderoots.com/Turquoise_About.html, if you want to know more about this magical stone.

 

 

What’s a Gemstone Roundtable? Would I want to go to one?

If you love gemstones, ask your jeweler if he/she hosts roundtable events.  These are usually evening events that last 2 – 3 hours, taking place after your jewelry store closes.  Food and drink are often served, and you are introduced to a gemstone expert.  This expert shares knowledge and stories about gemstones and the gemstone industry.  Sitting at a, usually rectangular, table, guests are given the chance to see, touch, and dib on approximately 100 different gemstones.  Dibbing simply means that you would like another look at that gemstone after it has gone around the table.  These gemstones are for sale, but there is never an obligation to buy.  The goal is to have fun learning about and playing with gemstones.

More people want to be involved in the making of their jewelry.  Mountings can mask flaws of gemstones, so it’s to the buyer’s advantage to see gemstones un-mounted.  And mountings can be unique if you work with a custom designer.  On-staff designers are generally at the roundtable event and they can help you with ideas for any gemstone you select for purchase.  The whole process of 1) picking out the gemstone; 2) deciding on a design; and 3) having the piece made by your local jeweler is a memorable one.

Dearborn Jewelers recently hosted a roundtable event with gemstone dealer, Judith Whitehead.  Our next event will be in September.  If you are interested in attending, give us a call and we can put you on the list.  It promises to be a great time.

roundtable1roundtable2